TI claims industry’s smallest 12V, 10A DC-DC step-down power modules

February 14, 2017 // By Nick Flaherty
Texas Instruments has launched two 12V, 10A, 4MHz step-down power modules that provide a power management design the company says is 20 percent smaller than any other 10A power module.

The SWIFT TPSM84A21 and TPSM84A22 DC-DC modules integrate power MOSFETs, shielded inductors, input and output capacitors, and passives into a low profile 2.3mm footprint with as little as 1 percent overshoot in transient conditions without special magnetics or additional capacitors. The  9 x 15 mm module and a single external voltage-setting resistor make up a complete solution footprint of 11 x 15 mm.

By using the step-down power module together with TI’s WEBENCH Power Designer, engineers can get their space-constrained point-of-load (POL) telecom, networking, and test and measurement power-supply designs to market faster. 

Unlike other 10A step-down modules, the highly integrated TPSM84A21 and TPSM84A22 require just one external voltage-setting resistor for a complete 12V step-down power solution. For an application such as powering tightly regulated field-programmable gate array (FPGA) rails, a typical 10A module would require up to 16 external capacitors. In comparison, the TPSM84A21 provides ultra-low output ripple from the high 4MHz switching frequency and integrated 185μF of output capacitance, which maintains regulation accuracy without any external capacitors.The low por

The 2.3mm profile means the module can be mounted on the back of a printed circuit board to savespace.The integrated input and output capacitors eliminate the loop compensation and magnetics part selection from the design process.

The TPSM84A21 with a voltage output of 0.55 V to 1.35 V and the TPSM84A22 with a voltage output of 1.2 V to 2.0 V are available in volume now. Offered in a 20-pin quad flat micro (QFM) package, the modules are priced at US$8.63 in 1,000-unit quantities. Order theTPS84A21EVM and TPS84A22EVM evaluation modules and download the PSpice transient models.

For more information, samples and an evaluation module, see  www.ti.com.